Seagull Parade

If I decide to go for an early morning walk at the local wetlands when it’s high tide, I often find that I am the first person there for the day. How do I know? By the seagull parade!

Silver gulls and Pacific gulls lining the boardwalk

Along the boardwalk are a few bridges over sections of the Tamar River, and there are lots of silver gulls and pacific gulls that are perched on the bridges in the early morning at high tide.

Pacific gulls
More gulls on another bridge
White faced herons hanging out with the pacific gulls
A closer look at some Pacific gulls
A large number of immature Pacific gulls can be seen

As I get close to the birds, they start to cry and take flight, and soon there are heaps of gulls flying overhead, heading towards the harbour.

Once disturbed, the birds don’t return, they must continue on with their day. I hate to disturb them, but walk I must, and they don’t seem overly upset as they are there again the following day.

I took this video of walking past the seagulls. Unfortunately, YouTube has removed the stabiliser enhancement feature so the video is a bit wonky.

As you can see, these birds do make a mess of the boardwalk, but a bit of rain cleans it up.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen so many gulls in one place before!

 

 

 

Summer’s Day Low Tide At The Wetlands

On a bright sunny summer’s day recently, I decided to try my luck birdwatching at Tamar Island Wetlands. I wasn’t expecting to see too much in the way of wildlife as it was quite a warm day and early afternoon with a low tide. I thought the majority of the birds would be hiding away in some shade somewhere, but I was quite surprised by what I found.

Low tide at Tamar Island Wetlands
Several great egrets and a cormorant hanging out together
Chestnut teal having a quiet midday snooze
Grey teals snoozing nearby
Another image of low tide at Tamar Island Wetlands
A variety of birds in one spot – black swans, great egrets, chestnut teals, grey teals and a masked lapwing
A young Australasian swamphen, the parent was close by.
A pair of geese foraging.
Cracked dried mud
A muddy beaked masked lapwing (plover)
A lovely cool and shady spot next to the bird hide
A grey teal with something to say
One of the lovely views from the boardwalk.
White faced herons.
A pair of chestnut teals.
Mother swan with her growing babies
Another view of the wetlands

If you ever find yourself in the Launceston area, it’s worth a trip out to the Tamar Island Wetlands as you can see all kinds of birds anytime of the day and the views are beautiful.

 

 

White Faced Heron

Recently I spotted a white faced heron perched on a neighbour’s roof catching some early morning sun. This one looks like it has some breeding plumage.

These birds are usually seen around bodies of water and I sometimes see them on my walks at the local wetlands, so I was quite surprised to see one on the roof nextdoor.

As I watched, this heron proceeded to cough up something.

It’s always funny when a bird suddenly catches your eye.

The heron then gazes out looking like it’s feeling better.

Then the bird turns around to get some more sun before flying off towards the river.

 

European Goldfinch

I had been seeing flashes of a small bird in my weedy garden lately (I promise I’ll get to it one of these days ….. πŸ™‚ ) and had been unable to determine what kind of bird it was until I spotted two of them the other day. They move so fast I couldn’t get a good photo so instead tried to video them.

I had never seen these birds before so had to research them. They are a European Goldfinch. These birds were introduced to south eastern Australia in the mid to late 1800s.

The male bird is very colourful and quite eye catching and I think the other bird in the video is a juvenile. They seem to love the seeds on the weeds. Now I have an excuse not to weed the garden bed! πŸ˜€

This is my last post for the year, so I hope you all have a happy and safe Christmas and best wishes for the New Year.

 

 

 

Wildlife Spottings At The Wetlands

Now that daylight savings has started, I have decided to go for a walk almost everyday at the local wetlands. I find that walking helps to unwind from a day’s work and it feels good to get out in the fresh air. Also, it is good exercise and great for the mind and spirit, and it’s even nice to say hello to regular walkers and joggers or stop and have a chat with someone taking photos of the birds.

Here are some of the gems I have spotted on my walks at Tamar Island Wetlands.

Surprisingly, I have seen a small number ofΒ geese. These are likely domesticated escapees from people’s homes around the area. I have spotted 2 pairs but only one had these little golden cuties.

Sadly, none of the goslings have survived.

A plentiful bird at the wetlands is theΒ black swan.Β I have identified 5 different families so far, all with babies of varying ages. It’s been nice to watch the little balls of fluff growing up. Here is one family.

And look at this adorable scene!

If I go walking early in the morning or late in the evening, I am usually lucky enough to see one of these lovely creatures – a pademelon!

In a previous post, I shared a photo of a Native Hen (or turbo chook) with half a dozen chicks that I came across in the car park. Sadly, there is only one chick left. Look how its grown!

Lately I have seen several Great Egrets fishing in the river. This one was fascinating to watch as it went after some food.

There was even a snake having a snooze by the boardwalk. Funnily enough, it was conveniently sleeping only 2 metres away from the snake warning sign so I knew it was a copperhead!

I was even lucky enough to see two Australasian Swamphen chicks up close. Aren’t they cute!

And finally, this is a video I took one afternoon of the 360 degree view from the end of the boardwalk at the Tamar River. I’m sure you’ll agree, it’s a magnificent view and well worth the walk. πŸ™‚

What little gems of nature do you see on your daily walks?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frankie The Welcome Swallow

The last few weeks I have noticed a welcome swallow perched on the railing on the front porch or on one of my window sills. He is there so often, I’ve called him Frankie. Isn’t he cute?

Welcome swallows are a common bird native to Australia. They are mad flyers, catching their food on the fly. They fly so fast it can be quite difficult to get a good photo of them. But they are a joy to watch as they fly overhead catching insects.

I haven’t seen much of these birds before now, but one swallow seems to like my house (or perhaps it’s the mirror tint on the windows!). Of course, I can’t tell if it’s the same bird I see all the time, but it’s funny how this bird perches on the front railing watching me when I get home from work almost everyday, like it’s welcoming me home. πŸ™‚

Even on rainy days, Frankie is there.

One time I caught Frankie sunbathing on a window sill. At first I thought something was wrong with him, but then I realised he was simply enjoying some warmth in the sun on a cool day.

(Yes, I know I need to clean the windows :D)

Welcome swallows have a delightful call, I have come to easily recognise it now since Frankie visits practically everyday and lets me know he’s there by his singing.

And here he is again on another day. I love the leg stretch!

I enjoy Frankie’s visits, I hope he keeps coming back. πŸ™‚